Work > 168 Hours

Drones (February 11, 2013: Part I)
embroidery floss/fabric
10.5" H x 7.5" W
2013
I Found Love At Last! (February 11, 2013: Part II)
Embroidery floss/fabric
10.5" H x 7.5" W
2013
Made in the USA (April 22, 2013: Part I)
Embroidery floss/fabric
10.5" H x 7.5" W
2013
Baby Brings Them Closer (April 22, 2013: Part II)
embroidery floss/fabric
10.5" H x 7.5" W
2013
The World According to China (June 17, 2013: Part I)
Embroidery floss, cotton
10.5" H x 7.5" W
2014
Boston Strong (June 17, 2013: Part II)
Embroidery floss/fabric
10.5" H x 7.5" W
2014
The Childfree Life (August 12, 2013: Part I)
Embroidery floss, cotton
10.5" H x 7.5" W
2015
First Days Home (August 12, 2013: Part II)
Embroidery floss, cotton
10.5" H x 7.5" W
2015
Majority Rule (October 14, 2013: Part 1)
Embroidery floss, cotton
10.5" H x 7.5" W
2015
Inside Her New Life (October 14, 2013: Part II)
Embroidery floss, cotton
10.5" x 7.5"
2016

Your average Books-A-Million carries several hundred magazines, each of which is typically cycled out once a week or month. The extreme market competition combined with their short shelf-life makes for an odd and thinly veiled spectacle. Covers are intense and designed to illicit an urgent purchase response. Yet a handful of days or weeks later, regardless of impact and story, the issue is replaced. In 2013, I began creating an embroidered archive of two of the most popular weekly magazines in the United States, Time and People. The selections are not edited or chosen according to content; instead they are serendipitous, cycled every two months. Issues released on the same day are juxtaposed, which creates a broader documentation of our culture and invites viewers to formulate their own perceptions.

The stitch replaces the pixel, and in doing so, interrupts the seamless imagery to reveal each cover as an elaborate construction. The slow process of stitching is a meditation. The act itself soothes the melodrama of each cover, just as breaking down the image with thousands of stitches mediates the severity of the charade. The hours spent stitching each cover coincides with the hours each spends on the newsstand. These hundred hours are simultaneously short and long.